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Getting your Yard Ready for Spring!
How to Prepare Your Lawn & Garden for Spring 
 
Although we're still in our Winter season, it's time to start thinking about spring projects, such as your lawn.
Winter weather can leave your grass, shrubs and trees weak and hungry, especially after months of lying dormant.  If you want them to come back fuller and lusher than ever, follow these simple tips from Ed Laflamme, a Landscape Industry Certified Manager. 
 
Get your yard ready for Spring.
 
Do some cleaning.
The first step to prepping your lawn for spring is to clean up the leaves, twigs and other debris that have gathered over the winter. Rakes work, but air blowers are even easier. “Debris can get stuck in your lawn mower, and it will block fertilizers and other materials from being properly absorbed by the lawn,” Laflamme says.
 
Apply fertilizer, pre-emergent and weed killer.
 
Early in spring, use a combination of fertilizer, which feeds your grass, and pre-emergent, an herbicide used to prevent crabgrass. Then, six to eight weeks later, apply both products again, along with a broadleaf weed killer. “You don’t want to let crabgrass come up or you’ll be fighting it all season,” Laflamme says. He notes that many lawn care brands offer a combination of pre-emergent and weed killer in one application, which will lower your cost and the time it takes to apply them.
 
Mow early, mow often.
 
“If you let the grass grow too high and then cut it, it stunts the roots so they can’t reproduce properly,” he warns. 
 
Pick a good, heavy mulch.
 
Once your lawn is cared for, edge out your beds, trim back dead branches on shrubs and replace the mulch. 
 
Trim the trees.
“It’s hard to tell if a tree has dead branches unless you get up into it,” Laflamme says. If dead branches are left untended, they can fall, causing property damage and potential injury. Consider hiring a tree trimmer to do a “safety prune” once every three years — ideally before the leaves come out, when it’s easier to see the condition of the branches.
 
LET'S ALL BE SAFE

ATV and GOLF CART SAFETY - Let's ALL Be SAFE!
Golf carts and all terrain vehicles were just not designed to be operated (especially by unsupervised children)  in the same high speed environment as larger motor vehicles. Did you know that Golf Carts and ATVs meet the statutory definition of a "motor vehicle"?